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TSB – The Story by Studio AKA

Studio AKA (London) tells the history behind the building of the TSB bank through this beautiful piece.

Combining the hand crafted artistry of 2D character animation within a stunningly integrated use of 3D CGI sets, the journey through time is reflected in the film’s opening shot; an unbroken take which lasts a whopping 95 seconds.

Check out some of the process below. Plus, there’s a 2-part interview on the D&AD website.

Written by – Marc Craste and Damon Collins
Client: TSB
Paul Pester
Catherine Kehoe
Mike Regnier
Terry McParlane

Agency: Joint London
Creative Director – Damon Collins
Producer – Matt Keen

Music: Anne Dudley
Sound Design: Factory

Production Company: Studio AKA
Writer/Director: Marc Craste
Producer: Nikki Kefford-White
Character Design: Steve Small
Additional Art Direction: Dave Prosser
Previsualisation: Christian Mills, Anna Kubik
Supervising Animators: Steve Small, Michael Schlingmann
2D Animators: Peter Dodd, Sharon Smith, Nicolette van Gendt
2D Assistant Animators: Nick Appleton, Gerry Gallego, Freya Hotson, Simon Swales, Margot Tsakiri-Scanatovits, Justine Waldie, Jonathan Wren
2D Paint: Eamonn O’Neill, Kristian Andrews, Gemma Mortlock
2D Compositing: Michael Schlingmann
Supervising CG Artists: James Gaillard, Christian Mills
Modelling & Texturing: Adam Avery, Sara Diaz, Will Eager, Vincent Husset, Raymond Slattery
Rigging: Adam Avery
Lighting, Rendering & Compositing: James Gaillard, Daniel Garnerone, Alex Holman, Christian Mills, Will Eager, Cristobal Infante
Simulation & FX: Cristobal Infante
3D Animators: Boris Kossmehl, Fabienne Rivory, Marie Verhoeven, Lucas Vigroux
Technical Director: Fabrice Altman
Editor: Nic Gill
Production Co-ordinator: Ren Pesci
Production Assistant: Alli Albion

Posted on 27 September 2013 |

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8 thoughts on “TSB – The Story by Studio AKA

  1. Normally, i get a bit bored when a project hinges on really obvious narrative device. But this one pulled me in.

    I think it’s the dramatic irony that makes it work — you know the original shop is there, buried behind everything — and you’re waiting for it to come back into play. The resolution is so satisfying.

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