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Posts tagged as short film

MPC: “Sunny and Steve – Enjoy the Sweets”

Just in time for Easter weekend, “Sunny and Steve” from MPC’s NY office has a look as cute and cuddly as its rascally rabbit antagonist.

From MPC’s site:

[MPC] set out to create the distinctive look of the animation by instilling a retro palette that visually represents each character’s personality and correlates perfectly with the handmade office setting, including the set build, which was created from scrap cloth, styrofoam, and wood, as well as the character’s puppet-like limbs, the boss’s facial mole, Sunny’s vexing whiskers, and Steve’s slight scar.

Credits

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Carlos Lascano: Lila

In this lyrical and poetic piece, Carlos Lascano, transforms the world with the help of Lila, a young woman reminiscent of Amélie, who “can’t resign herself to accept reality as flat as she perceives it” says Lascano.

Lascano’s talent as an animator has long been acknowledged, and in this film, his directing skills really shine. No dialogue is needed here to move the story’s concept forward and Alma Garcia’s acting is flawless from beginning to end. Lascano describes the film as the completion to a trilogy, which include “A Short Love Story in Stop Motion” and “A Shadow of Blue.”

In a Short Love Story, a young girl daydreams about what she has just drawn on paper, while in a Shadow of Blue, a young girl finds her inspiration in the flight of monarch butterflies. All three films are filled with a sense of hope and optimism, and portray a world in which life and fantasy become one. Lila is a mesmerizing conclusion to a thematic trilogy that suggests that there may be. and should be, a little of Lila in all of us.

Hat tip to Valeria Sandoval

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Yves Geleyn: Monster in the Closet

Yves Geleyn (Hornet) brings his trademark charm to bear on a chilling subject for States United to Prevent Gun Violence in “Monster in the Closet.”

CREDITS
Director: Yves Geleyn
Produced at Hornet Inc
Executive Producer: Michael Feder
Head of Production: Greg Bedard
Producer: Jan Stebbins
Editors: Joel Miller & RJ Glass
Assistant Editor: Stephanie Andreau
Storyboard Artist: J. Todd Anderson
Character Designer: Oren Haskins
Background Designer: Mark Boardman
Supervising Technical Director: Sang-Jin Bae
Lead CG Artist & Compositor: David Hill
CG & Compositing: Richard Kim
Modeling: Erwin Riau & Dan Fine
CG Animation: Sean Thorpe, Andrew Boccio, Emily Griswold
Lead 2D Animator: Mike Luzzi
Animators: Keelmy Carlo, Mark Pecoraro, Nivedita Sekar, Frank Summers
Animation Clean Up: Emma Noble
Development Producer: Kristin Labriola
R&D: Arman Matin

Edited by Joel Miller at Cut and Run
Assistant Editor: Tom Akey
Assistant Editor: Stacy Peterson
Producer: Melati Pohan
Executive Producer: Rana Martin
Composed by Mark Mothersbaugh of Mutato Muzika
Producer: Natalie P. Montgomery
Engineered by: Bradley Denniston

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Daniel Savage: Helium Harvey

Not sold on the idea of going back to school? Neither was Daniel Savage.

The NYC-based designer/director just released his animated short, “Helium Harvey,” a labor of love that doubled as self-directed education:

After much debate on whether to go to graduate school or not, I decided I would take part of 2013 off to explore storytelling and character driven narrative on my own. I turned down most commercial jobs (except the really exciting ones), read as many books as I could, explored things outside of my comfort zone, and made “Helium Harvey.”

It was completely self funded, teaching a few classes at NYU and online, as well as select freelance projects to help pay for it.

Q&A with Daniel Savage

Let’s rewind to before you decided to make Helium Harvey. You were considering going to grad school, right? Why?

I come from a graphic design background, so jumping into character driven narrative isn’t an easy task. It’s a different way of thinking. But I love the idea of cartoons and technology meeting, so that’s where my interest is.

Originally, I wanted to make a story app, but I felt I had a lot to learn in animation first.

How did you come to the idea of making a short film?
I guess it’s what everyone comes out of school with, so it made the most sense. Plus I had the idea of Harvey for a while, so I wanted to make that.

Do you feel that making Helium Harvey was a good substitute for going back to school? Or was it a different kind of learning?
It’s tough to say. I’m sure I would have a better film if I was surrounded by other people in the same situation, but I like to learn the hard way. When someone tells me something it goes in one ear and out the other. I think it depends on the person.

Looking back, are you happy you decided not to go to school? Are you considering still going in the future?
I am happy, it was a great year. I don’t think I will go back, I will always take a class here or there though.

How hard was it to fund everything yourself?
Not very hard, it was really about time more than money. My rent is super cheap, I was on my lovely girlfriend’s health insurance, and having a skill I’ve developed (After Effects animation) that I could help other people learn was my biggest asset. People got something valuable out of it, and I got enough money to make a film. I still took on a few fun jobs, which also helped pay for it.

For those that are thinking of doing the same thing, can you give them advice/warnings?
I would take it slow, do a month here and there (being freelance helps) to practice new skills before jumping into a project as overwhelming as a film.

Making of “Helium Harvey”

The making of montage is bursting with goodies, from concept art to time-lapsed After Effects sessions.

Bonus footage of the orchestra recording session after the jump →

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Cisma: Criolo “Duas de Cinco”

If Spike Jonze’s vision of the future in Her was too sunny for you, try on Denis Cisma’s decidedly bleaker take in this short film inspired by Criolo’s latest album, “Duas de Cinco.”

Set in the south side of São Paulo, where Criolo grew up, the short involves 3D printed weapons, futuristic drugs and the inescapable dangers of poverty. The film seems to agree with the old adage: the more things change, the more things stay the same.

From the release:

From the start, the director imagined a record of the Brazilian’s “favelas” in the future, 30 years down the road, in 2044. This idea was too ambitious to materialize without large sums and Criolo is an independent artist, but became possible with the support of the Grajaú community and the production team.

Nearly the entire cast is made up of friends of the singer and people who live in the neighborhood, most of whom had never acted before. The main cast includes Daniel Dantas, Morgana Naughty and Léo Loá, young students chosen with help from the drama teacher of CEU Jaçanã public school, named Tiago Ortaet.

Produced through Paranoid, Clan did an admirable job handling all post-production.

Credits

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Dvein: We Wander

In Dvein’s latest short, “We Wander,” you won’t find CG fluid sims or virtual Rube Goldbergs of visual oddities. Instead, you’ll find haunting visuals of animals carousing in the dusky liminal spaces between darkness and light, nature and civilization and hunted and hunter.

Each shot crackles with graphical clarity, despite being a live action production. The sound design, foley work and music add a hyperreal edge to every animal movement, creating a surreal, visceral undercurrent to the strange narrative that unfolds.

Credits

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Saschka Unseld & Pixar: The Blue Umbrella Making-Of Holiday Calendar


The highlight of my 2013 advent calendar season was Saschka Unseld‘s The Blue Umbrella Making-Of Holiday Calendar.

Now that all twenty-four days have been revealed, enjoy a master class in making an animation short – from reading the original pitch to pre-enacting story beats with real umbrellas to early cinematography tests to story reels to color scripts to rain dramaturgy charts to amazing camera capture workflows.

Big thanks to Saschka and Pixar for sharing all of the hard work that went into creating this story!

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