Big Spaceship goes analog for their new endtag

Big Spaceship goes analog for their new endtag

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About the author

Justin Cone

/ justincone.com
Together with Carlos El Asmar, Justin co-founded Motionographer and F5. He currently lives in Austin, Texas with is wife, son and fluffball of a dog. Before taking on Motionographer full-time, Justin worked in various capacities at Psyop, NBC-Universal, Apple, Adobe and SCAD.

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  • barret

    That’s great, but do I have to pay $ 25 to watch the making of?

    • bohemten

      I agree it’s awesome, but the fact we have to pay $25 to watch it, kinda kills it for me….but we are in some sort of recession so every dollar counts i suppose.

  • worldpattern

    The making of piece on Lynda.com was interesting, especially that they composited in the mouth completely separately from the mountain top (and shot footage of the mountain tilted back to match the movement).

    (Fortunately, my company pays for a subscription to Lynda so we can watch everything there all the time.)

  • I’ve actually asked Lynda.com to share the making of for free on Motionographer. Seems like it be good promo for them. We’ll see if I hear anything back…

  • nbody

    I didn’t watch the for-pay videos, but by the look of the free intro vid, their technique for the typography was much more simplified than how it used to be done, even in the 80s. (if anyone is interested)… Rather than laying on a green slab, dimensional model type like that would’ve been mounted on thin railings, thus allowing for it to fully interact with any backlighting (something the Big Spaceship piece noticeably lacks), then the rails would be easily hand roto’ed out (the whole point of using model type back then was to exploit spectacular lighting techniques that were unachievable synthetically). Or it would be mounted on glass, shot on MoCo with a second pass of the letters in black shadow with a white background as a ready-to-go matte pass to remove all the reflections of the lights in the glass.

    • Good lord, what a gigantic pain in the ass. Interesting, though. Thanks for the info!