Psyop: Adidas “Hu Jia”

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The latest installment in the Adidas Beijing Olympics campaign maintains the poetic tone and hand-rendered styling of its predecessors. But this new spot is my favorite, if only for the beautifully realized metaphor of the sinking steps (pictured above). What an elegant way of conveying the frustration of continually being second place.

The shifts between the three presentational modes of Hu Jia—live action, sketched and full CG—are artfully handled. Oh, and I’m especially fond of the splash effects.

Stink/Psyop co-produced these, with Psyop handling the direction, animation and post-production.

Full credits

About the author

Justin Cone

/ justincone.com
Together with Carlos El Asmar, Justin co-founded Motionographer, F5 and The Motion Awards. He currently lives in Austin, Texas with is wife, son and fluffball of a dog. Before taking on Motionographer full-time, Justin worked in various capacities at Psyop, NBC-Universal, Apple, Adobe and SCAD.

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3 Comments

jan

Free tibet yo!

sc

really an inspiring work. the sinking steps is so simple, probably the easiest segment to execute, yet it speaks volumes in a language anyone could understand. I just hope the people in china get a chance to see this somehow, with their access to most of the world’s information blocked and all…

govinda

CG Hua under water wasn’t so well executed. But it’s a really good spot.

The end shot, with Hua resting on the hands of people ‘supporting him’ has an unintentional double meaning. The main meaning is a nice one–he’s in his hometown of Beijing getting support during the 2008 games. But the dark, huddling black/white mass can’t help but suggest an unintentional second meaning–with anything about the awful Chinese regime, there are always victims who have to be silenced before the Chinese authorities feel comfortable displaying their little Potemkin Village to the eyes of foreigners. Tibet, obviously, but also all kinds of inconvenient people, from the poor people being shipped out of Beijing before the Games start to political dissenters. Personally I have no interest in watching these Olympics, but everyone is free to make their own choices.

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