Masters of Motion Podcast Interviews Raoul Marks (of Antibody) on His Most Iconic Works

Masters of Motion co-founder and podcaster Matthew Packwood interviews Raoul Marks from Antibody on creating Emmy-award winning titles for True Detective, Westworld & The Crown, as well as working in gaming and with high-end brands.

Listen Now: www.mastersofmotion.com.au/podcast 

Topics Discussed:

– Advice to Motion Designers & 3D Artists
– Working overseas and career development
– Failures in your career & hard things you had to learn
– Transitioning from graphic design to motion design
– Passion projects: Spring & Semi-Permanent 2015
– Experience of working on True Detective
– Awards – winning Emmys
– Working remotely & pipeline and equipment
– Creative partnership with Patrick Clair
– Working for Elastic studio in Los Angeles & Remotely
– Working in Advertising, Game Cinematic’s & with brands
– Projects discussion:

1) The Crown
2) West World
3) Man In The High Castle

– Reflection & the Future

Podcast Also Available on: Spotify – Apple – Google Podcasts – Stitcher – Soundcloud

 

Raoul Marks – About

Raoul Marks is an Emmy-award winning, Bafta-nominated Director and 3d Motion Designer. Along with creative partner Patrick Clair at Antibody, Marks has created some of the most iconic opening title sequences of all time, including True Detective, American Gods, Lovecraft Country, Man in the High Castle, Westworld and The Crown. Raoul also works for clients in the music, fashion, sporting and gaming industries, including Adidas, Louis Vuitton, MTV Halo and Far Cry 6. Raoul is both a outstanding 3D generalist and a 2d design-driven artist.

www.raoulmarks.com & www.antibody.tv

What is Masters of Motion?

Masters of Motion is a non-for-profit website, social media channel and podcast that provides the world with an insight into the Australian and New Zealand Animation industry. Comprising an online gallery featuring outstanding motion design, animation and visual effects work.

Listen Now : www.mastersofmotion.com.au/podcast