Ash Thorp: Project 2501, Homage to Ghost in the Shell [NSFW]

[NSFW] Designer/director Ash Thorp teamed up with photographer Tim Tadder and over 20 artists to reimagine the title sequence to the classic anime film, “Ghost in the Shell.”

The making of above is for the full set of boards, which can be viewed on the Project 2501 site, which also includes full credits.


Ruoyu Li gangsta philosopher

i am confused. Where is the animation?


Where is not?


Very frustrating, why is the animation not viewable anywhere? Is this just a teaser?

Justin Cone

Yeah, it is a little confusing. That’s why I wrote: “The making of above is for the full set of boards…”

The boards are pretty damn impressive on their own.

Matt Brushinski

I’m not sure if there is a final animation. Reading through the paragraphs on their page, he stated that it started as a photography piece in homage to the Ghost in the Shell titles. It looks, from what I can see, that they created stand alone images specific to segments of the titles. Hope I’m wrong and that we will see a final project, if this isn’t it.


No animation yet. Anyone wants to help out? :P


Need a “NSFW” on this-

Justin Cone

Agreed. Added. Sorry about that.


watching this in my edit suite with a client behind me and all of a sudden there’s a naked woman swimming in a pool on the big screen, LOL…awkward


I’ve no sympathy. If you’ve seen GITS, you know there is nudity in it. If you’ve not seen it, why would you screen something related to it for a client without watching it first?

And why would your client object to the beauty of the human form being displayed so elegantly (not sexually nor explicitly)? Dump your client.

Or perhaps your client wasn’t offended, and you felt awkward for no reason… Then the client should dump you. ; )


Why reimagine at all. The GITS movie was great. But why not do something of your own imagination.


I much agree. Imagine what we would be lacking if Masamune Shirow and Mamoru Oshii had instead spent their time recreating (or creating “mashups”) of things that inspired them.

These sort of exercises are a great way for students to learn, much like a child copying Dr. Seuss illustrations, but they shouldn’t be applauded any more than we applaud plagiarism. They’re actually uncreative.

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