ROYGBIV: AIKO

Today, the Los Angeles-based collective ROYGBIV released the teaser for their upcoming animated series Aiko.

Created by Evan Viera and Charley Pope, Aiko is a haunting tale of struggle and loss set in a world very much like our own… but with monsters.

Synopsis:

As an inhuman army of unknown origin rips apart her homeland, a young girl discovers within herself a well of mystical power that she neither wants nor understands. Together with her sister and an old sage, she strikes out across the war-torn countryside, searching for the truth behind an ancient family secret that could save the world from annihilation.

To find out more about Aiko and how you can get in touch, you can find the press kit here.

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About the author

Joe Donaldson

/ www.jodie.work
Joe Donaldson is one of the editors of Motionographer. Working closely with Justin Cone, their hope is to help grow our community while celebrating the exceptional work being created on a daily basis. Additionally, Joe recently joined Ringling College of Art and Design where he works as a professor in the Motion Design department. Before joining Ringling, Joe worked as a director, designer and animator in Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, and has had the honor of directing work for clients such as Apple, Google, Facebook, Instagram, The New York Times and Unicef.

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  • Jeffrey Grutter

    Amazing! I hope this gets picked up. Does anyone have a clue as to how they are achieving that beautiful soft glow and soft chromatic aberration around light spots?

    • My guess: A few judicious plug-ins in AfterEffects, like:

      http://www.schoolofmotion.com/chromatic-aberration-in-nuke-ae/
      and/or
      http://aescripts.com/real-glow/

    • Evan Viera

      Actually nothing fancy here. The soft glows are just gradient layers set to dodge and overlay. But with a light touch.

      The chromatic aberration is just the R,G, and B channels distorted separately with gray scale gradients as intensity mattes.

      Thanks, I’m glad you enjoyed it!

      • Fantastic. Simple does it. Thanks for the added info, Evan!

        • Evan Viera

          No problem and thanks again for the support.

      • Jeffrey Grutter

        As simple as it may be, I’d still love to see a breakdown or maybe you could steer me in the direction of where you picked up the knowledge of this technique? This work (as well as your past work) is truly inspiring and has really stirred something up in me as an artist. Sorry to post this on such a public platform, I’d love to message with you directly if you are willing. Again, AMAZING stuff. Cheers!

        • Evan Viera

          Hey Jeffery, that’s kind of you to say.

          Well we’re planning to release a process breakdown soon, although it will mostly feature the animation process.

          I hope to get to a comp and fx animation breakdown as well, but honestly I’m struggling to find time for it.

          Once we post them, I’ll announce on Twitter. /orchidanimation

  • Evan Viera

    Also, thanks Joe and all for the post! It’s very much appreciated.

  • John Lane

    I can see the slight difference in the effects to the different color channels. It’s nice. I was wondering about tools for character animation. It’s just right; good posing and turns, but not so slick that it looses the hand drawn look. Was something like TV Paint used, or was this all Photoshop. I like Harmony for long form work, myself, and am looking forward to the animation timeline for Krita – like TV Paint, now in beta.